Keeping Coffee Fresh

by laura everage on May 29, 2013 · 1 comment

Moisture, air, light and heat: These are the four elements that can affect the fresh taste of your roasted coffee. But, in the high-heat, high-moisture, sunlight-filtered environment of the kitchen, many of us just throw caution to the wind and rip open that bag of coffee, take what we need for that pot in the morning, then roll down the top of the bag and secure it with a piece of tape or the attached twist tie, forgetting about it until the next time you reach for the coffee.

If you take a look at the bag you bought your coffee in, you’ll probably see a “roasted on” date. A little closer look and you will also see a reminder that coffee is best enjoyed when consumed within two weeks of roasting. Herein lies the problem: Most day-to-day coffee consumers fall short read these suggestions, but they never heed these suggestions.

But really, keeping your coffee fresh until ground and brewed isn’t very hard to do. Whether or not you believe that you can taste the difference between fresh and stale coffee, why not give it a try? With these simple suggestions, you can at least have peace of mind.

  • Don’t rely on folding over the bag and using the twist tie to secure the freshness of the beans. Air can enter folded over bags, and as we all know, air is one of those enemies of coffee.
  • No, don’t turn to the refrigerator or freezer to help you out. Coffee in the fridge or freezer can pick up odors and moisture from its surroundings.
  • Stop the urge to store your coffee in that ceramic container you previously used for cookies, pasta, or rice, and set it next to the stove.  Chances are that it isn’t airtight, causing the coffee beans to absorb any heat, moisture, or odors from the kitchen.
  • Instead, grab yourself a container that is specially made to help maintain freshness of coffee, such as the BeanSafe.

This airtight coffee storage container is especially helpful for freshly roasted beans that still may be releasing gas, the BeanSafe Pressure Release Valve is unique. It uses a combination of silicone membrane and a perfectly round glass ball, which together permit CO2 to be released when the pressure inside the container (from CO2 emitted by the roasted coffee) reaches a sufficient level. At the same time, the one-way valve doesn’t permit air and gasses from outside to enter the container. Simply use the locking mechanisms on the lid, which seal off the top of the canister – you can be sure that your coffee will be kept fresh.

What makes it even more appealing, is that The BeanSafe  is tested to last at least 400,000 repetitions (opening and closing), and the Pressure Release Valve never requires cleaning, maintenance, or replacement. Both the container and lid are dishwasher safe.

Versatile for use with whole bean and ground coffee, BeanSafe can be used to protect tea, spices, herbs and other aromatics. And, for the coffee professional, bean safe offers 5 gallon lids that fit all five gallon buckets.

Made of food-grade polypropylene, 304 stainless steel, and ceramic, it is a available in stainless steel, white and black for under $20. That’s a small price to pay to keep you investment fresh until you’re ready to grind and brew it.
For more information, check out the BeanSafe online at the company website, or you can purchase it at  Bed Bath & Beyond Inc, Amazon, and Coffee Bean Direct. It is also offered in-store at Bed Bath and Beyond, Dillard’s, Gracious Homes and Zabar’s.

In addition, BeanSafe is being offered by coffee roasters such as: Village Coffee Roastery , Wilkinson’s Tea & Coffee Emporium, Roast Artisan Roaster, and Mugsies Coffee House.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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